RTC-08: 1956 Sonata for Violin and Piano

Commission: Written for Harry Adaskin and Frances Marr
Length: 18 min.
Completion: 26 August 1956
Premiere: 1956, Harry Adaskin, violin, and Frances Marr, piano, Vancouver Art Gallery
Other:

  1. 1960-06-01, Jack Kesseler, violin, and Robin Wood, piano, CBC Radio Broadcast
  2. [date?], Albert Pratz, violin, and Pierre Souvrain, piano, CBC Radio Broadcast
  3. [date?], Lea Foli, violin, and Willliam Aide, piano, Eva Clare Hall, U of Manitoba
  4. [date?], Jack Kessler, violin, Swiss Radio Broadcast
  5. [date?], Arthur Polson, violin, CBC Radio Broadcast
  6. 1985-02-10, Jack Glatzer, violin, and Ada Bronstein, piano, Eva Clare Hall, U of Manitoba
  7. 1989 February, Jack Glatzer, violin, and Delores Keahey, piano, Canada House, London, England
  8. 1989-03-24, Jack Glatzer, violin, and Delores Keahey, piano, Winnipeg Art Gallery.

Recording:

  1. Albert Pratz, violin, and Pierre Souvrain, piano, Radio Canada International – ACM 15, 1983
  2. Jack Glatzer, violin, and Dolores Keahey, piano, E-Gré: The Eckhart-Gramatté Foundation, 1990

Publication: CMC


“Certain sections in all three movements employ a twelve-tone row. The lyrical introduction is followed by a rhythmic and percussive allegro. The second movement is also lyrical with the violin muted. The last movement is gay and boisterous and ends with the reappearance of the theme from the opening introduction.”

[Notes from E-Gré recording]

The first movement – Introduction and Allegro – begins with a soft, lyrical introduction – with a lyrical 7-note theme – followed by a loud “allegro agitato” section.
Second movement – “Aria alla Chaconne” – chaconne bass line is 6-note theme (repeated 3x in f-sharp – followed by inversion on f (together they make a 12-tone row) – also repeated 3x (chords in right hand are derived from respective 6-tone row) …
Third movement is a joyful and boisterous toccata, ending with a reappearance of the introductory theme.
The twelve-tone method is not used consistently – as proscribed by Schoenberg, etc. – rather as merely another means of expression – of deriving thematic material for his creative process.